Third

Job hunting was hell.

Especially if you’re in a third world country where the profession is considered as a commodity for export. Competition is hard; you need a good ranking, a good education, and the right connections (which she thankfully all have). But before you have an actual job at your chosen institution, you would need to go on training for certain skills and other licenses, which means money, in addition to that you would need to pay the hospital, who would (hopefully) employ you, to train you at their institution.
It’s more money down the drain really, especially if you consider the abysmal paycheck in proportion to your investment and insane work load.

It pisses her off that nurses in her country are undercompensated. She blames it on capitalism and globalization. Nurses from her country usually just work there for a minimum of 2 years before moving on to another country with better financial compensation.  That causes a fast turnover in the work force, which should be good. But the case is, there are many nursing graduates in the country, because parents (and relatives from countries with greener pastures) want their children to take up nursing so they can work abroad. So the selection process is quite bloody (not literally), although it produces top notch nurses for first world countries.

Some nurses end up working in BPOs and other non-course related fields. Which sometimes pay better than hospitals, but is probably a waste of 4 years of hellish nursing school. Some get stuck there, but some only work there temporarily just to get funding for the hospital training, and probably for a ticket to the first world.

She finds it quite sad really, the irony. That the nurses from her country are probably one of the best in the world, yet health care there (especially for the less fortunate and far-flung areas ) is not really up to par with some better parts of the world. It is not due to the lack of skill of the health professionals, rather it is due to the lack of funding and unequal distribution of health care.

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